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aQuieterBreeze
 #1 

How do we get the message across?
How do we get the message across about the importance of hearing protection-
Before someone winds up with tinnitus or hearing loss, or hyperacusis - from something that is too loud?
Not too long back I noticed that
a considerate person was wondering how to get the message,
about using hearing protection - in loud environments, across to his family.
(So they do not wind up with Tinnitus or hearing loss)
I also think it is important - to try to educate others, in a way they will hopefully listen to.
I hope people that wonder about that- will see my message here-
and maybe something I say can help-

When it comes to explaining things to those you are concerned about  -
about tinnitus and hearing loss -
Maybe the thought of, and knowing about, Hyperacusis, would make a difference
- in them being willing to protect their hearing?

MAYBE the thought of not "just" an added sound (Tinnitus)
  But the thought that they may be not be able to tolerate (or listen to) music,
  or have long phone conversations, (or maybe even short phone conversations)
or go to Any future concerts, at least for a long time- may have an impact?
I wish someone had warned me! I had no idea that something too loud- just once may be all it would take-
I never heard of hyperacusis though, (and I was not really aware of the link between volume and tinnitus either)
- and maybe if i had had known- I would have left.
But i did not know.
I used to tell people when I would explain it-
(Sometimes while covering my ears with my hands as I asked them to turn something down)
That everything sounded too loud to me - and I could not even listen to music.
That looked like it got their attention-
And sometimes I would tell them to remember me - as I told them to take earplugs along,
Whenever they go someplace loud - (like a concert)- and use them if necessary-
or leave if it's still too loud.
 I do not know- if they will remember, but I hope they will.
 These days after several years, I can finally listen to Some music again-
 (though I still have to be pretty careful with the volume, and other settings)
 And  I can still have a difficult time with long phone conversations and many other things that
 people take for granted. The last restaurant I went to was somehow too much for me and I got a setback- even though it was not loud.
 And I am doing alot better than I had been.

I do not know if young people these days  are even remotely aware about what getting tinnitus can mean for some-
and maybe they think with hearing loss they will just be able to turn up the volume?
But with hyperacusis- the whole world can sound too loud- for a Long time.
So I would say- tell them about hyperacusis - and tell them that one time can be all it takes.
(I wish I had known.)
Maccy
 #2 
Hi Breeze,

A very interesting post. I told the board a while ago about my daughter going to an al day concert that involved listening to 13 bands through the day. I was so worried. I never stopped going on about it to her and in the end we both got really cross with each other. I asked her to take ear plugs and she just said "Yeah Mom, that will look really cool!!!" Typical teenager eh? well she went and actually I think I must have said something because she kept leaving the concert hall and sitting outside for short breaks. And she was fine.

It was so difficult to get the message across to my own daughter.She had first hand experience of living with me when I was really suffering from H & T at that time (not so bad now). So my point is here, if I can't get someone so close to me to understand about it, how difficult it is to get the message over to strangers.

I agree that this should be taught in schools from an age where they can understand, say 10 or 11 years when IPOD's etc start to become the most important things in their lives! Also, the companies that make these should ensure that there is a maximum level of sound that is produced.

Only my opinion of course.

Mandy


winterbridge55
 #3 
How not to get noise induced Tinnitus and Hyperacusis

Education by PCP, ATA, Public Service Announcements and a Surgeon General Warning on every single solitary thing that a consumer purchases that can cause noise damage.

The musicians that are exposing kids to loud music could be influential if they spoke about hearing conservation before playing their music. Many of them already wear musician ear plugs.


I recently stopped by a Radio Shack and spoke to a young salesperson, 23 y/o who is a drummer. He told me he had ringing in his ears and how distressful it is, but did not know what tinnitus was.

aQuieterBreeze
 #4 
Hi Mandy,

I agree it can be really hard to get others to understand,
you mention-
well she went and actually I think I must have said something because she kept leaving the concert hall and sitting outside for short breaks. And she was fine.

I am glad she was ok from the concert,
I know that with concerts, sometimes it may not just be the band, but some crowds can be louder than others as well- and some venues can also sound louder too - like some indoor venues verses some outdoor ones.
I have not been to a concert in a long time though -
And I wonder what the effects of those newer types of speakers/sound systems that are used these days really are?
Speaker systems used to be  different, and my ears never rang when I left a concert.

You also mention-
I agree that this should be taught in schools from an age where they can understand, say 10 or 11 years when IPOD's etc start to become the most important things in their lives! Also, the companies that make these should ensure that there is a maximum level of sound that is produced.

I agree, it should be taught in schools and there should be public service announcements too.

I THINK that at least some portable music devices now have a "volume limiter" of some sort, built in- but I do not know which ones, or if it is mandatory. Also if I remember right, an article I had seen awhile back mentioned that, at least on one device,
the way the volume limiter  was set to start with, was Off.
So in order to be effective, it had to be turned on. (though I do not remember which specific device that article was referring to. And that may have changed by now.)

Mark -
you mention-

The musicians that are exposing kids to loud music could be influential if they spoke about hearing conservation .......

I agree and I think there are alot of ways they could do that.

There is one well known musician that I am aware of,  that I think has been pretty active in trying to warn people about the hazards and/or consequences of playing or listening to music to loud.
I wish more were involved in that sort of thing though. But maybe they are- and I just don't know about it?

I also think that most of the focus, when people do think about hearing problems from loud noise, is on tinnitus and hearing loss, and along with more information about those conditions, and how to prevent them, I would really like to see hyperacusis mentioned more as well.
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