This board is closed

Please see www.tinn.com
Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Community Board
 
 
 


Note: This topic is locked. No new replies will be accepted.


Reply
  Author   Comment  
aQuieterBreeze
 #1 
To Dr. Nagler, Dr. Chip, and any others who may be really knowledgeable about hyperacusis-

In your experience of treating patients for hyperacusis,
(or in dealing with hyperacusis if you are not in the medical field)
How long does it usually take- for recovery?
For someone who has had setbacks that can last for a long time?

And also for those whose setbacks don't last as long? Is there a difference in the amount of time that recovery usually takes?

I am under the impression that at least sometimes, it can take quite awhile,
and along the way- recovery happens gradually-
Is that common for most people who have hyperacusis, and are in, or are following a program designed to help them rebuild their tolerances?

Thank you for your thoughts.

The following was posted in another thread -
Quote:
Peach posted [in part]:

Under what circumstances does hyperacusis get better and under what does it get worse?

..............

I have thought a lot about this particular question over the years.  And I have come to the conclusion that hyperacusis always improves with desensitization unless the hyperacusis is due to a neurological lesion like in Lyme disease, which is relatively rare.

In my opinion if a person's hyperacusis is not improving with "sound enrichment," then either the sound enrichment is not being used as effective desensitization ... or that person's sound sensitivity is due to hyperacusis AND another problem that has not been properly diagnosed (like misophonia, for instance) - and the lack of improvement is due to the undiagnosed (and therefore untreated) component.

smn


DrNagler
 #2 
QB, please define what you mean by "recovery."

Thanks -

smn
winterbridge55
 #3 
My experience with h has been difficult. I thought when I got t the worse was over, then I realized I had h too. I use sound therapy every night. I loop the sound of rain and while it can be calming it has never done a thing for helping my h. Also, when I go to the gym, people throw heavy weights onto the weight lifting bars and when they clang I get an involuntary startle which I feel in my heart. That can't be good! While the overall gym environment is tolerable except for the music and weights sometimes I have to wear plugs. Everyday I get reminded that the h is still there. Stepping out onto the deck this morning I heard a crow in the tree. While it was not startling it was loud.
Dr. N you said:

In my opinion if a person's hyperacusis is not improving with "sound enrichment," then either the sound enrichment is not being used as effective desensitization..... or that person's sound sensitivity is due to hyperacusis AND another problem that has not been properly diagnosed (like misophonia, for instance) - and the lack of improvement is due to the undiagnosed (and therefore untreated) component.


Is sound enrichment a must do therapy for tinnitus and hyperacusis? I ask this because there are times after about 6 hours of sleep that I believe my t/h are worse because of listening to the rain cd. I then shut the machine off and some of the t noises subside. This is true sometimes when using sound therapy during the day. I can't believe that sound enrichment whether it be music or white/pink noise is always the right thing to do. Is it ok to just know that t is there but not let it bother you without the aid of sound therapy?  I know this goes against popular advise but I am more comfortable dealing with the unexpected by having a small piece of a Mack silicone earplug just to dampen sound. If I go back to work I can't see being desensitized enough to deal with the "uncontrolled" world of noise w/o protection. I think I could go to work and use CBT techniques but at the end of the day are my ears going to be better off for it physically even though cognitively I told myself this is not going to hurt me? Are you sure the auditory/nervous systems and its components, i.e. ear hair cells, aren't being negatively impacted on a physical level not using ear protection? If you say no, how do you prove that to me? We don't have diagnostics to examine ear hairs. With all the expensive treatments that sometimes work the cheapest way to get relief is what a member on another site has to do to get himself to work everyday. 4 mg Xanax, 50 mg elavil and 100mg of seraquil. 
DrNagler
 #4 
Mark posted [in part]:

Is sound enrichment a must do therapy for tinnitus and hyperacusis?

............

I don't know what "sound enrichment therapy" is!  Please define it - and then I'll try to offer an opinion.

.............

Is it ok to just know that t is there but not let it bother you without the aid of sound therapy?

.............

As far as I'm concerned it's "OK" to use any strategies you desire (as long as they are not deleterious to your health).  Tinnitus is basically a nuisance.  It can be a little nuisance (as it is in the vast majority of instances) or it can be a life-altering catastrophe (as it was for me).  What you do or don't do about it largely depends on how much your tinnitus impacts your life, and what you want to realistically achieve in terms of relief.

..................

I know this goes against popular advise but I am more comfortable dealing with the unexpected by having a small piece of a Mack silicone earplug just to dampen sound. If I go back to work I can't see being desensitized enough to deal with the "uncontrolled" world of noise w/o protection. I think I could go to work and use CBT techniques but at the end of the day are my ears going to be better off for it physically even though cognitively I told myself this is not going to hurt me?

.................

Again this is all a matter of strategy and what you hope to realistically achieve.

..............

Are you sure the auditory/nervous systems and its components, i.e. ear hair cells, aren't being negatively impacted on a physical level not using ear protection?

..............

Am I absolutely 100% sure that exposure to, say, 80dB of sound for eight hours five days a week will not cause hair cell damage to at least one person among the 6.7 billion human beings inhabiting this planet?  No.

Nor am I 100% sure that if I cross the street only on a green light within the crosswalks after looking both ways that I won't get killed by a car driven by a drunk driver coming around the corner while going twice the speed limit.  But I cross streets anyway.

..............

We don't have diagnostics to examine ear hairs.

..............

If you mean that we do not have the ability to use a powerful microscope to view hair cells in live human subjects, I agree.

..............

With all the expensive treatments that sometimes work the cheapest way to get relief is what a member on another site has to do to get himself to work everyday. 4 mg Xanax, 50 mg elavil and 100mg of seraquil.

...............

Well, it's not all that cheap if you have to do it every day for forty years, but I've got no problem with it myself.

smn

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

DISCLAIMER:  This board is for the purpose of education, discussion, and support.  Information found here should not substitute for appropriate consultations with qualified medical professionals.  Participants are responsible for securing consent for posting copyrighted material.  By using this board, participants agree to hold the owner of the board, its moderators, and all other participants harmless with respect to any loss, injury, claim, liability or damages arising from the use of material found on this site or on any third-party web sites accessed through links on this board.